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Case Assignment Should be finished within 12h Please kindly check the attachment below. FASB Codification – Business Test > >     Definition of a Busines

Case Assignment Should be finished within 12h

Please kindly check the attachment below. FASB Codification – Business Test

> >     Definition of a Busines

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Case Assignment Should be finished within 12h

Please kindly check the attachment below. FASB Codification – Business Test

> >     Definition of a Business

805-10-55-3A   

A business is an integrated set of activities and assets that is capable of being conducted and managed for the purpose of providing a return in the form of dividends, lower costs, or other economic benefits directly to investors or other owners, members, or participants. To be considered a business, an integrated set must meet the requirements in paragraphs 805-10-55-4 through 55-6 and 805-10-55-8 through 55-9.

805-10-55-4 

A business consists of inputs and processes applied to those inputs that have the ability to contribute to the creation of outputs. Although businesses usually have outputs, outputs are not required for an integrated set to qualify as a business. The three elements of a business are defined as follows:

a. Input. Any economic resource that creates, or has the ability to contribute to the creation of, outputs when one or more processes are applied to it. Examples include long-lived assets (including intangible assets or rights to use long-lived assets), intellectual property, the ability to obtain access to necessary materials or rights, and employees. 

b. Process. Any system, standard, protocol, convention, or rule that when applied to an input or inputs, creates or has the ability to contribute to the creation of outputs. Examples include strategic management processes, operational processes, and resource management processes. These processes typically are documented, but the intellectual capacity of an organized workforce having the necessary skills and experience following rules and conventions may provide the necessary processes that are capable of being applied to inputs to create outputs. Accounting, billing, payroll, and other administrative systems typically are not processes used to create outputs. 

c. Output. The result of inputs and processes applied to those inputs that provide goods or services to customers, investment income (such as dividends or interest), or other revenues. 

805-10-55-5

To be capable of being conducted and managed for the purposes described in paragraph 805-10-55-3A, an integrated set of activities and assets requires two essential elements—inputs and processes applied to those inputs. A business need not include all the inputs or processes that the seller used in operating that business. However, to be considered a business, the set must include, at a minimum, an input and a substantive process that together significantly contribute to the ability to create output. Paragraphs 805-10-55-5A through 55-5C provide a practical screen to determine when a set would not be considered a business. If the screen is not met, further assessment is necessary to determine whether the set is a business. Paragraphs 805-10-55-5D through 55-6 and 805-10-55-8 through 55-9provide a framework to assist an entity in evaluating whether the set includes both an input and a substantive process.

> > >     Single or Similar Asset Threshold

805-10-55-5A

If substantially all of the fair value of the gross assets acquired is concentrated in a single identifiable asset or group of similar identifiable assets, the set is not considered a business. Gross assets acquired should exclude cash and cash equivalents, deferred tax assets, and goodwill resulting from the effects of deferred tax liabilities. However, the gross assets acquired should include any consideration transferred (plus the fair value of any noncontrolling interest and previously held interest, if any) in excess of the fair value of net identifiable assets acquired.

> > >     Single Identifiable Asset

805-10-55-5B   

A single identifiable asset includes any individual asset or group of assets that could be recognized and measured as a single identifiable asset in a business combination. However, for purposes of this evaluation, the following should be considered a single asset:

a. A tangible asset that is attached to and cannot be physically removed and used separately from another tangible asset (or an intangible asset representing the right to use a tangible asset) without incurring significant cost or significant diminution in utility or fair value to either asset (for example, land and building) 

b. In-place lease intangibles, including favorable and unfavorable intangible assets or liabilities, and the related leased assets. 

> > >     Similar Assets

805-10-55-5C   

A group of similar assets includes multiple assets identified in accordance with paragraph 805-10-55-5B. When evaluating whether assets are similar, an entity should consider the nature of each single identifiable asset and the risks associated with managing and creating outputs from the assets (that is, the risk characteristics). However, the following should not be considered similar assets:

a. A tangible asset and an intangible asset 

b. Identifiable intangible assets in different major intangible asset classes (for example, customer-related intangibles, trademarks, and in-process research and development) 

c. A financial asset and a nonfinancial asset 

d.Different major classes of financial assets (for example, accounts receivable and marketable securities) 

e. Different major classes of tangible assets (for example, inventory, manufacturing equipment, and automobiles) 

f. Identifiable assets within the same major asset class that have significantly different risk characteristics. 

> > >     Framework—Inputs, Substantive Processes, and Other Considerations

805-10-55-5D   

When a set does not have outputs (for example, an early stage company that has not generated revenues), the set will have both an input and a substantive process that together significantly contribute to the ability to create outputs only if it includes employees that form an organized workforce and an input that the workforce could develop or convert into output. The organized workforce must have the necessary skills, knowledge, or experience to perform an acquired process (or group of processes) that when applied to another acquired input or inputs is critical to the ability to develop or convert that acquired input or inputs into outputs. An entity should consider the following in evaluating whether the acquired workforce is performing a substantive process:

a. A process (or group of processes) is not critical if, for example, it is considered ancillary or minor in the context of all the processes required to create outputs. 

b. Inputs that employees who form an organized workforce could develop (or are developing) or convert into outputs could include the following: 

1.  Intellectual property that could be used to develop a good or service 

2.  Resources that could be developed to create outputs 

3.  Access to necessary materials or rights that enable the creation of future outputs. 

Examples of inputs that could be developed include technology, mineral interests, real estate, and in-process research and development.

805-10-55-5E   

When the set has outputs (that is, there is a continuation of revenue before and after the transaction), the set will have both an input and a substantive process that together significantly contribute to the ability to create outputs when any of the following are present:

a. Employees that form an organized workforce that has the necessary skills, knowledge, or experience to perform an acquired process (or group of processes) that when applied to an acquired input or inputs is critical to the ability to continue producing outputs. A process (or group of processes) is not critical if, for example, it is considered ancillary or minor in the context of all of the processes required to continue producing outputs. 

b. An acquired contract that provides access to an organized workforce that has the necessary skills, knowledge, or experience to perform an acquired process (or group of processes) that when applied to an acquired input or inputs is critical to the ability to continue producing outputs. An entity should assess the substance of an acquired contract and whether it has effectively acquired an organized workforce that performs a substantive process (for example, considering the duration and the renewal terms of the contract). 

c. The acquired process (or group of processes) when applied to an acquired input or inputs significantly contributes to the ability to continue producing outputs and cannot be replaced without significant cost, effort, or delay in the ability to continue producing outputs. 

d. The acquired process (or group of processes) when applied to an acquired input or inputs significantly contributes to the ability to continue producing outputs and is considered unique or scarce. 

805-10-55-5F  

If a set has outputs, continuation of revenues does not on its own indicate that both an input and a substantive process have been acquired. Accordingly, assumed contractual arrangements that provide for the continuation of revenues (for example, customer contracts, customer lists, and leases [when the set is the lessor]) should be excluded from the analysis in paragraph 805-10-55-5E of whether a process has been acquired.

805-10-55-6  

The nature of the elements of a business varies by industry and by the structure of an entity’s operations (activities), including the entity’s stage of development. Established businesses often have many different types of inputs, processes, and outputs, whereas new businesses often have few inputs and processes and sometimes only a single output (product). Nearly all businesses also have liabilities, but a business need not have liabilities. In addition, some transferred sets of assets and activities that are not a business may have liabilities.

805-10-55-8

Determining whether a particular set of assets and activities is a business should be based on whether the integrated set is capable of being conducted and managed as a business by a market participant. Thus, in evaluating whether a particular set is a business, it is not relevant whether a seller operated the set as a business or whether the acquirer intends to operate the set as a business.

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