I need this by Tuesday. English homework help

I need this by Tuesday. English homework help

Click here to Order a Custom answer to this Question from our writers. It’s fast and plagiarism-free.

Please see attachments.

Assignments Englifh composition 1.rtfd/TXT.rtf

ASSIGNMENT#1

Assignment Guide: The Personal Narrative
Assignment Prompt
For this assignment, you will be writing a personal narrative–a story–illustrating an event, moment (or series of moments), or experience exemplifying gratitude. In other words: share a story about a moment, experience, or event where you experienced gratitude either during the experience itself or after the experience took place.  
Assignment-Specific Requirements:
Length: This assignment should be at least 550 words. 

Thesis

: Underline your descriptive thesis statement or the point of your story.
Sources/Evidence Needed:  No outside/secondary sources are needed.
Page Formatting: See Appendix C – Formatting and Submitting Your Work

MLA

Requirements: See Formatting your Essay: MLA 8th Edition

Rhetorical Mode
A personal narrative is a story about you. Narrative, from the Latin narrare, means to narrate a tale or a story. The narrative you will write will be a “personal” narrative.  Thus, the story will be written by you, about you, and in a lot of ways, for you. What makes a personal narrative so interesting is that it’s a story with a point or purpose.   In other words, a personal narrative is detailed, descriptive, dialogue-driven, and determined to make a point. 
Rhetorical Considerations Purpose:
There needs to be a reason, not only for writing the narrative, but also for why the reader should read it. The purpose of the personal narrative is to share a meaningful experience and the lesson learned from the experience. Specifically, the purpose of this essay is to share a story about a time you experienced gratitude.
Audience:
In many ways, we write a personal narrative for ourselves to reflect upon an experience, to grow from an event. However, we want you to imagine that your audience is not only you but someone else. The writer needs to know who their audience is and how their needs will affect the way the narrative is composed and presented. For example, in addition to writing this story as an opportunity for personal reflection, you may also choose a family member or friend group as your real or imagined audience.  Selecting a real or imagined audience will help you develop your essay with the right tone. The tone for a personal narrative can be formal or informal; it really depends on your chosen audience

Form:
This piece of writing will be presented using a story format.  It will have a beginning, middle, and end.  The story will be written with a clear introduction paragraph, a body of story-development paragraphs, and a concluding paragraph. While a personal narrative is less “formal” than traditional academic writing, your story should have a thesis statement. Thus allowing the reader to truly understand the point of your story.

Six Features of a Personal Narrative
Essay Organization: The Personal Narrative is organized with a clear beginning, middle, and end. It should read like a story–with an exposition, a rise action, a climax, a falling action and a resolution or denouement.  While the Personal Narrative is certainly less formal than other academic essays, the point or moral of the story (i.e. the thesis) should be very clear to the reader.


Transitions:
The Personal Narrative utilizes paragraph breaks and transitional words and phrases that help the audience (or reader) flow in and around the story. Read more about paragraph transitions in Appendix A. 

Character DescriptionDevelop the characters in the story so that the reader has a clear understanding of the people in the story–even if the one person in the story is YOU. Help your reader learn about the characters both by what they say and by what they do.

Sensory Details: Develop a sense of imagery within the story using sensory-driven details. In other words, create a vivid story by helping the reader to see, hear, taste and touch just as the characters in your story do. Sensory details bring your readers into the story–into the experience you are sharing with them.


Dialogue:
Use internal and/or external dialogue to connect the characters and help propel the story forward. Dialogue helps the writer to “show” rather than “tell” the story to the reader.  Tips for formatting dialogue can be found in Appendix C. 

The Thesis
(the message driving your story): Your story’s point or purpose should be structured as a thesis statement. And this statement should be underlined.  As the direction of your story must be made clear to the reader, it would naturally make sense that the point of your story or thesis appear somewhere within the first paragraph.   


Grading Guide: The Personal Narrative
ENG 101 Rubric: Personal Narrative

 

Points
0-1

Points
2

Points
3

Points
4

Points
5


Introduction

&

Theme

/Thesis

20%
Opening “hook
Thesis/Main Point

The opening “hook” is not present. The main point/theme of the essay is not evident and/or distracts from the story.

The opening “hook” is not apparent.
The main point/theme (thesis) of the essay is difficult to discern.

The opening “hook” is attempted, but it may/may not be successfully engaging.
The main point/theme (thesis) of the narrative is somewhat evident, though it may lack strength.

The opening “hook” is present and may/may not enhance the reader’s interest in the narrative.
The main point/theme (thesis) of the story is clear and while it does not NEED to appear in the first paragraph, it is included and clear to the reader.

The opening “hook” grabs the reader’s attention.
The main point/theme (thesis) of the story is both clear and captivating, and while it does not NEED to appear in the first paragraph, it is thoughtfully included and clear to the reader.

Details and Essay Development (Body Paragraphs)
20%
Describe the experience.
Sensory Details
Order of events
Dialogue

The author does not portray the narrative in a manner or format that effectively helps the reader to understand the point of the story, and nor does the story have a succinct and/or clear beginning, and/or middle and/or end.  Character and plot details are minimal.

The author does not infuse enough sensory details into the narrative to clearly extrapolate the point of the story or characters. In fact, some details may be irrelevant to the author’s conveyed experience. The story’s beginning, and/or middle and/or end may lack development and/or clarity.

The author does not use enough sensory details to outline the point of the story or the characters within it.  As well, the noted details may not always be relevant to the author’s conveyed point of the experience. The story’s beginning, and/or middle and/or end  may lack development and/or clarity.

The author uses some sensory details to outline the point of the story and the characters within it. These details may occasionally lack specificity; however, they  are relevant to the experience. Dialogue may be attempted to drive the plot. The story has a clear beginning, middle and end.

The author uses vivid sensory details to outline the point of the story as well as the characters within it. Meaningful dialogue drives the plot. The author shares details that are specific and relevant to this experience. The story has  both a thoughtful and clear beginning, middle and end.

Closing 20%
 Impact statement re: gratitude
Thesis readdressed

The closing/concluding paragraph does not explore the writer’s said experience of gratitude. The point of the story, or thesis, is not readdressed adequately or is missing completely.

The closing/concluding paragraph does not successfully illustrate that the author’s said experience was one illustrating gratitude.  The point of the story, or thesis, needs to be reinforced and further clarified.

The closing/concluding paragraph illustrates elements that the author’s said experience was one illustrating gratitude, but further development is needed. The point of the story, or thesis, is somewhat reinforced and readdressed, but further clarity may be needed.

The closing/concluding paragraph somewhat illustrates that the author’s said experience was one illustrating gratitude.  The point of the story, or thesis, is readdressed.

The closing/concluding paragraph explicitly illustrates that the author’s said experience was one illustrating gratitude.  The point of the story, or thesis, is reinforced and readdressed in a meaningful way.
 


Language

and Style 13.3%
Sentence Structure (Grammar)
Word Choice/Vocabulary (Redundancy, repetition, awkwardness)

The writer has given very little or no apparent consideration to language and style. Word choice is sloppy and/or incorrect.

The writer’s use of language and style diminishes the nature and strength of the essay. Writer’s language/style choices make the essay less cohesive and/or difficult to understand.

The writer’s use of language and style, at times, deters from his/her/their overall argument. The writer’s word choice and style sometimes detracts from the overall message.

The writer’s use of language and style helps convey the author’s point(s). The writer almost always uses language and style as a tool to enhance the personal narrative.

The writer’s use of language and style accentuates the nature of the essay. Writer wields language and style as a tool to enhance the personal narrative.

Punctuation, Capitalization 13.3%
Comma errors, comma splices, apostrophe errors, capitalization errors, semicolon errors, colon errors, typos/misspellings

Contains more than 6 different punctuation/capitalization errors.
The identical or similar errors may be repeated throughout. 
The errors help to significantly deter from the writer’s overall narrative.

Contains many (more than 4)  different punctuation/capitalization errors. The identical or similar errors are repeated throughout.
The errors deter from the writer’s overall narrative.

Contains more than 3 different punctuation/capitalization errors. The identical or similar errors may be repeated throughout. At times, the errors deter from the writer’s overall narrative.

Contains 1-2 types of punctuation/capitalization errors, which may be repeated throughout the essay. The errors do not deter from the writer’s overall narrative, but they serve as a distraction.

Contains either no punctuation/capitalization errors, or no more than 2 different errors with no repetition, and/or the errors do not deter from the writer’s narrative.

Attention to Directions/ Format 13.4% Essay Formatting requirements, as noted for the course.
Minimum word count: 550 words

Doesn’t meet formatting and/or word count requirements, and as a result, the writing  is difficult to read or unreadable.

Meets very few formatting requirements, and those missing deter from the readability of the writing. Word count minimum may not be met.

Meets some formatting requirements: the lack of appropriate formatting may lead to a lack of readability or to a distraction while reading.
Word count minimum may not be met.

Meets most formatting requirements; the formatting does not discourage readability. Word count minimum is met.

Meets all of the suggested essay formatting requirements; formatting enhances the readability of the writing. Word count minimum is met.

Color-Coded Personal Narrative
Last Name 1
First Name Last Name
English Composition 1
Personal Narrative
4 March 2020

The Obstacles of My Childhood Taught Me to be The Example I Never Had
As a bi-racial girl raised in a small, non-diverse town in a lower social class, I was faced with racism and a lack of support.(1) These obstacles impacted my career aspirations, as I struggled with self-identity, confidence, and direction. I believed my future was limited. I maintained that thought even into high school, until one fateful day when I received a proposition from an unlikely source.(2) I am incredibly grateful to my high school guidance counselor for recognizing my talents and encouraging me to purse a student teller position; this piece of confidence was all I needed to excel in my career.(3)
In 1976, we moved from Japan to a very(4) rural and poor, rundown town(6) on the west coast. Just off the tail of the Vietnam War, we encountered ignorance with no warm receptions to “Orientals.” My father was White, but my mother, brothers, and I were the only Asian persons in a dominant White community. As a mixed-race individual, I did not have anyone to look up to as an example or understand my identity challenges (which part of me do I identify with?).(5) This perception I had of myself was so strong that I believed being Asian was a hindrance.(8)
As a(4) small, scrawny child,(6) I had dreams of being a performer, despite my lack in confidence overall; I was sure that the masses would be entertained with my singing, dancing, and acting.(4) However, by the time I started middle school, the harsh reality of not being on the stage or big screen began to set in. I had minimal to no resources to help me achieve that vision. I did not have access to a legitimate theater/studio or have the financial means of traveling outside of my town to watch a show or take lessons. I also did not have the support from my family or the belief from those around me that I could be this performer.(5) That dream dissipated, and I floated around lackadaisically, only focusing on my desperation for acceptance.(8)
When I was 15 years old, I had been doing well in my office technology class and was enjoying my role as the school’s primary office aide.(4) My guidance counselor noticed how apt I was in this role, and she stopped me one day in the hallway.(5)
“You’re doing quite well as the school office aide. Might you consider one of the student teller positions?” she asked.(7)
Surprised by her compliment, I said, “I am open to learning more about it and will stop by your office later in the day.”(7)
Intrigued by the compliment and offer, I did, indeed stop into the school counselor’s office, who greeted me with a huge smile, which I am guessing meant that she was surprised that I held up my word.(5)
“I have this packet of information all ready for you,” she said as she handed me a folder of(7) heavy papers.(6) Before I knew it, months of learning about the position and filling out(5) dizzying paperwork(6) landed me in a student teller position at a local bank that my school had a partnership with. I quickly realized that I thrived in an administrative and service-oriented type of role—my counselor was right.(5) I was now determined to move forward in my life, and that step into the workforce gave me the confidence and knowledge to build a foundation for the future.(8)
Although I held many job positions since high school, I never established a career that I felt destined for.(4) I focused my efforts on raising my children and working sporadically to keep my skillset relevant in the administration field. Unfortunately, in 2012, I found myself weathering a(5) painful divorce,(6) single parenting, and recreating myself. Little did I know that the challenge from my high school guidance counselor and the resulting student teller position would ultimately come back around full circle after I sat to think one day.(5)
What did I enjoy doing most in all of my working years, I considered.(7)
Lo and behold, I found out that they were restructuring and looking for someone to further their student branch program’s growth—it felt like destiny when I was offered the position.(8)
I still sometimes

Place your order now for a similar assignment and have exceptional work written by one of our experts, guaranteeing you an A result.

Need an Essay Written?

This sample is available to anyone. If you want a unique paper order it from one of our professional writers.

Get help with your academic paper right away

Quality & Timely Delivery

Free Editing & Plagiarism Check

Security, Privacy & Confidentiality