NEED A PERFECT PAPER? PLACE YOUR FIRST ORDER AND SAVE 15% USING COUPON:

PLAGIARISM FREE “A” WORK IN 8 HOURS Or LESS Read the assigned Gallagher & Thordarson (Chapter 1) in the e-book text (ATTACHED) Write your reflections to th

PLAGIARISM FREE “A” WORK IN 8 HOURS Or LESS Read the assigned Gallagher & Thordarson (Chapter 1) in the e-book text (ATTACHED) Write your reflections to th

Click here to Order a Custom answer to this Question from our writers. It’s fast and plagiarism-free.

PLAGIARISM FREE “A” WORK IN 8 HOURS Or LESS Read the assigned Gallagher & Thordarson (Chapter 1) in the e-book text (ATTACHED) Write your reflections to the assignment by selecting an idea from the reading, describing your thoughts and feelings about it. Along with a title page in APA format, write 2 pages of double-spaced, 12 pt. Times New Roman text.

                                                             Reference:

Gallagher, A., & Thordarson, K. (2018). Design thinking for school leaders : Five roles and mindsets that ignite positive change. ProQuest Ebook Central https://ebookcentral.proquest.com 1

Chapter 1

Design-Inspired Leadership

A leader takes people where they want to go. A great leader takes

people where they don’t necessarily want to go, but ought to be.

—Rosalynn Carter, former First Lady

A Call to Action
It’s no secret: schools need to change. Everywhere you go, edu-
cators are talking about change. Whether at educational confer-
ences, school district meetings, or in school hallways, there are
many discussions about the need for education to be different.
Sometimes it feels as if we are living in an echo chamber, with
everyone talking about and even agreeing that change needs
to happen, but most are unsure where to start. In many places,
a “culture of powerlessness” has been accepted as the status
quo. Teachers and site leaders feel bound by habits, traditions,
and test scores, mostly because our current school system is

Gallagher, Alyssa, and Kami Thordarson. Design Thinking for School Leaders : Five Roles and Mindsets That Ignite Positive
Change, Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development, 2018. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/amridge/detail.action?docID=5437456.
Created from amridge on 2021-08-30 17:17:58.

C
o
p
yr

ig
h
t
©

2
0
1
8
.
A

ss
o
ci

a
tio

n
f
o
r

S
u
p
e
rv

is
io

n
&

C
u
rr

ic
u
lu

m
D

e
ve

lo
p
m

e
n
t.
A

ll
ri
g
h
ts

r
e
se

rv
e
d
.

2 • Design Thinking for School Leaders

designed around two primary design principles, both of which
are outdated:

1. Students come to school as empty vessels or blank slates ready
to have their heads filled with knowledge.

2. This is best accomplished in an assembly-line format in which
students are batched and grouped to proceed through a fixed
amount of knowledge to prepare them for their futures.

These two design principles served us well for many years, but
are no longer sufficient. In a VUCA—Volatile, Uncertain, Chaotic,
Ambiguous—world, what does it mean to prepare our kids for
their futures? Are we learning as fast as our world is changing? If
not, why not? Now, more than ever, school leaders, both in class-
rooms and administrative offices, are needed to move us beyond
the conversation about change and start making changes.

So how do we move beyond the talk?

Portrait of a School Leader
School leaders have historically been portrayed fairly negatively
in the media. From Ferris Bueller’s Day Off to the HBO series Vice
Principals, school leaders are almost always inane characters or
ineffective managers at best who care more about the rules and
procedures than the actual well-being or education of students
at their schools. While those portrayals may not be accurate,
they do highlight the traditional view of “principal as manager,” a
role that no longer captures the complexity of school leadership.
And while it is easy to laugh at the ways in which principals are
portrayed, sadly, the role of the principal hasn’t evolved as much
as the world around it. This failure to morph the principal into a
more modern leadership role may be one of the reasons for such
a high turnover rate. Annually, there is a 20 percent turnover rate
among public school principals. Year after year, approximately
12 percent of all school principals leave the profession, either to
retirement or other careers, and 8 percent move on to other roles

Gallagher, Alyssa, and Kami Thordarson. Design Thinking for School Leaders : Five Roles and Mindsets That Ignite Positive
Change, Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development, 2018. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/amridge/detail.action?docID=5437456.
Created from amridge on 2021-08-30 17:17:58.

C
o
p
yr

ig
h
t
©

2
0
1
8
.
A

ss
o
ci

a
tio

n
f
o
r

S
u
p
e
rv

is
io

n
&

C
u
rr

ic
u
lu

m
D

e
ve

lo
p
m

e
n
t.
A

ll
ri
g
h
ts

r
e
se

rv
e
d
.

Design-Inspired Leadership • 3

within education. This number is only slightly lower in private
schools (Goldring & Taie, 2014). And sadly, turnover is much
worse in troubled schools, where every year, nearly 30 percent of
principals quit and, by year three, more than half of all principals
leave their jobs. We can’t help but wonder if all this transition is
partly due to dissatisfaction with the role of school principal.

Unfortunately, the high turnover rate is not only limited to
school principal roles; it applies to teachers as well. In the past, it
was common to celebrate teachers’ retirements representing 25
to 35 years of teaching. Nowadays, it is a much different picture.
In the last 15 years, the turnover rate has increased, with teach-
ers leaving the classroom for alternative careers in educational
technology or leaving the field of education altogether. Studies
from the U.S. Department of Education show that 17 percent of
teachers who entered the field in 2007–2008 left the profession
within the first five years. Teacher leaders are an important key
to creating the change that is needed, not only because changes
are needed in the classroom, but also because we need a quali-
fied leadership pipeline for the future. What if there were more
or different opportunities for teacher leaders? Could we create a
new profile of the school leader that is more effective and there-
fore more appealing?

Disruption
The world is changing rapidly. Our learners have changed, and
everything in the world of education must change, as well. We
are in the middle of major disruptions in almost every industry
(see Figure 1.1), including learning, yet our roles and infrastruc-
tures haven’t kept up. Learning has been disrupted by technol-
ogy, which has altered how we learn. For the first time in history,
people of all ages can learn anything they want at any time of day
with little more than a device and an Internet connection.

For example, making the news in Ohio, an 8-year-old decided
he was hungry, but both parents were fast asleep in the house.

Gallagher, Alyssa, and Kami Thordarson. Design Thinking for School Leaders : Five Roles and Mindsets That Ignite Positive
Change, Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development, 2018. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/amridge/detail.action?docID=5437456.
Created from amridge on 2021-08-30 17:17:58.

C
o
p
yr

ig
h
t
©

2
0
1
8
.
A

ss
o
ci

a
tio

n
f
o
r

S
u
p
e
rv

is
io

n
&

C
u
rr

ic
u
lu

m
D

e
ve

lo
p
m

e
n
t.
A

ll
ri
g
h
ts

r
e
se

rv
e
d
.

4 • Design Thinking for School Leaders

He had seen his parents drive their car and decided the best way
to quickly learn was to watch videos on YouTube. After viewing
what he felt was enough instruction, he and his younger sister
ventured out to McDonald’s . . . in their parents’ car! While it was
a short distance to travel, he apparently followed every rule of
the road and handled the vehicle without incident. Imagine the
surprise of the McDonald’s worker when an 8-year-old expertly
pulled up to the drive-thru window. Learning has changed.

Figure 1.1

Disruption
A few indicators of global change:

• The world’s biggest taxi company does not own any taxis (Uber).

• One of the largest accommodation providers owns no real estate (Airbnb).

• What has become one of the most popular media sites creates no content (Face-
book).

• The world’s largest movie provider owns no cinemas (Netflix).

• Two of the largest software vendors don’t write their apps (Apple and Google).

Source: From “The Battle Is for the Customer Interface,” by T. Goodwin, 2015, TechCrunch. Retrieved from
https://techcrunch.com/2015/03/03/in-the-age-of-disintermediation-the-battle-is-all-for-the-customer-
interface/.

The World Economic Forum, a nonprofit organization estab-
lished in 1971, engages political, business, and societal leaders
in discussions around the many issues facing our world. One
of their primary concerns is education, because they don’t see
education broadly making the changes necessary to keep up with
how fast the rest of the world is evolving.

“We are today at the beginning of a Fourth Industrial Revolu-
tion. Developments in previously disjointed fields, such as artifi-
cial intelligence and machine learning, robotics, nanotechnology,
3D printing, and genetics and biotechnology are all building on
and amplifying one another. Smart systems—homes, factories,
farms, grids, or entire cities—will help tackle problems ranging

Gallagher, Alyssa, and Kami Thordarson. Design Thinking for School Leaders : Five Roles and Mindsets That Ignite Positive
Change, Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development, 2018. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/amridge/detail.action?docID=5437456.
Created from amridge on 2021-08-30 17:17:58.

C
o
p
yr

ig
h
t
©

2
0
1
8
.
A

ss
o
ci

a
tio

n
f
o
r

S
u
p
e
rv

is
io

n
&

C
u
rr

ic
u
lu

m
D

e
ve

lo
p
m

e
n
t.
A

ll
ri
g
h
ts

r
e
se

rv
e
d
.

https://techcrunch.com/2015/03/03/in-the-age-of-disintermediation-the-battle-is-all-for-the-customer-interface/.The

The Battle Is For The Customer Interface

https://techcrunch.com/2015/03/03/in-the-age-of-disintermediation-the-battle-is-all-for-the-customer-interface/.The

Design-Inspired Leadership • 5

from supply-chain management to climate change” (World Eco-
nomic Forum, 2016b, p. 1).

With the world changing so quickly, how can we get to a place
where schools are experimenting and able to adapt at the rate
needed to keep up? We are in the middle of major disruptions that
are requiring new abilities and roles in our future workplaces.
Innovation is pushing us to fine-tune our skills in data collection
and interpretation and demanding that we master lifelong learn-
ing. With the rate of change increasing exponentially, leadership
will also need to draw on new strategies and practices to work
with and support new talent, the younger population of educators
who are more adaptable and accustomed to a change-oriented
environment. The skills to manage, shape, and lead the changes
underway will be in short supply unless we take action today to
develop them. “For a talent revolution to take place, governments
and businesses will need to profoundly change their approach to
education, skills, and employment, and their approach to working
with each other” (World Economic Forum, 2016b, p. 7).

The role of school leaders—whether the principal or the head
of school—needs a major disruption, too. What if leaders were
able to approach their work more like designers? Designers actu-
ally see the world differently and therefore bring a new perspec-
tive to their work. This new perspective is desperately needed in
schools and really does begin with the school leader. We call this
new perspective design-inspired leadership and believe it is one
of the most powerful ways to spark positive change and address
education challenges using the same design and innovation prin-
ciples that have been so successful in private industry.

Design-Inspired Leadership
The word “design” can be elusive to define; however, we know
it when we see it. We certainly know when we experience poor
design, because it usually means that something isn’t working.

Gallagher, Alyssa, and Kami Thordarson. Design Thinking for School Leaders : Five Roles and Mindsets That Ignite Positive
Change, Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development, 2018. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/amridge/detail.action?docID=5437456.
Created from amridge on 2021-08-30 17:17:58.

C
o
p
yr

ig
h
t
©

2
0
1
8
.
A

ss
o
ci

a
tio

n
f
o
r

S
u
p
e
rv

is
io

n
&

C
u
rr

ic
u
lu

m
D

e
ve

lo
p
m

e
n
t.
A

ll
ri
g
h
ts

r
e
se

rv
e
d
.

6 • Design Thinking for School Leaders

In a blog post on experience mapping by Jared Spool (n.d.) we
came across this definition of design:

“Design is the rendering of intent (para. 7).”

A designer works to make their intentions real in the world.
Regardless of our background and experience, educators are all
actually designers with the common goal of making education
better. Design might happen unintentionally, but it happens.
From the principal planning next week’s staff meeting, to the cre-
ation of school goals, implementation of new programs, and the
meeting of new mandates, we are constantly designing. Without
taking the time to understand design principles, many leaders
are operating as “accidental designers,” occasionally stumbling
upon innovative ideas or solutions. With more background on
design, we believe we can help leaders shift from “accidental
designers” to “design-inspired leaders,” acting with greater inten-
tion and achieving greater impact.

Design-inspired leadership deals with more than just pro-
cess; it is rooted in mindsets that you adopt in your work.
Approaching Design Thinking as just a process can reduce it
to a series of meetings and checklists. Design-driven leadership
offers opportunities for moments of impact, often unscripted and
unplanned but still intentional, and the mindsets are what help
you identify these opportunities. These mindsets correspond to
the five roles of leaders embedded within design-inspired leader-
ship (see Figure 1.2), which will help you move from an acciden-
tal designer to an intentional designer—one who embraces an
explorer’s mindset, ready to discover something new rather than
return to something familiar. Intentional designers in education
will need tools for creating real, lasting, and replicable change in
their schools and districts.

Design-inspired leadership is a shift from the traditional
view or role; it is a dramatic move away from Leader as Manager
and a move toward Leader as Designer. Figure 1.3 outlines traits
of both traditional leadership and design-inspired leadership.

Gallagher, Alyssa, and Kami Thordarson. Design Thinking for School Leaders : Five Roles and Mindsets That Ignite Positive
Change, Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development, 2018. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/amridge/detail.action?docID=5437456.
Created from amridge on 2021-08-30 17:17:58.

C
o
p
yr

ig
h
t
©

2
0
1
8
.
A

ss
o
ci

a
tio

n
f
o
r

S
u
p
e
rv

is
io

n
&

C
u
rr

ic
u
lu

m
D

e
ve

lo
p
m

e
n
t.
A

ll
ri
g
h
ts

r
e
se

rv
e
d
.

Design-Inspired Leadership • 7

Figure 1.2

Roles Embedded Within Design-Inspired Leadership

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

Opportunity
Seeker

Experience
Architect

Rule
Breaker

Producer Storyteller

Which column inspires you more? What type of leader do you
want to work for? What type of leader do you want to be?

This book is for school leaders who understand the need to
lead differently, but could use some practical help in imagining
a new role, both what it looks like and how to get there. Written
with a clear goal in mind, this book will put you in the driver’s
seat and enable you to make choices about both the pace of
change and the distance you wish to travel. Even if you only
engage with a few of the strategies partway, we believe they
will result in positive changes for your school. We will reframe
the role of a school leader by sharing five new roles and tools
to develop the skills necessary to make these changes. Each of
these five roles includes a set of stances and mindsets. Some
roles may feel very familiar in your work, while others may be
new. While the outcomes of design-inspired leadership can be
dramatic, the steps you take don’t need to be. The change to this
new way of leading can be accomplished with a series of small
steps that build over time into big wins.

We will explore the following five roles in this book:

1. Opportunity Seeker. Shifts from problem solving to problem
finding and actively seeking opportunities.

Gallagher, Alyssa, and Kami Thordarson. Design Thinking for School Leaders : Five Roles and Mindsets That Ignite Positive
Change, Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development, 2018. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/amridge/detail.action?docID=5437456.
Created from amridge on 2021-08-30 17:17:58.

C
o
p
yr

ig
h
t
©

2
0
1
8
.
A

ss
o
ci

a
tio

n
f
o
r

S
u
p
e
rv

is
io

n
&

C
u
rr

ic
u
lu

m
D

e
ve

lo
p
m

e
n
t.
A

ll
ri
g
h
ts

r
e
se

rv
e
d
.

8 • Design Thinking for School Leaders

Figure 1.3

Traditional Leadership Versus Design-Inspired Leadership

Traditional Leadership Design-Inspired Leadership

• Leader (teacher) centered

• Heavily influenced by organiza-
tional hierarchy and time in the role

• Afraid to venture beyond what
has been strictly deemed “best
practices”

• Yes, but, or no

• Begins with constraints

• Slow to act

• Starts with answers

• Fearful of unknown

• Prefers things to fit in their boxes

• Takes the safe path

• Values being right and risks avoid-
ance

• Fixed mindset

• User (student) centered

• Recognizes the intelligence in the
room regardless of “status” within
the organization

• Not afraid to go beyond “best
practices” to experiment with new
solutions

• Begins with possibilities. Leads with
“What if . . . ?”

• Bias toward action

• Starts with questions

• Embraces ambiguity

• Comfortable with the messiness of
learning

• Values great questions and experi-
mentation

• Growth mindset

2. Experience Architect. Designs and curates learning experiences
based on needs that stretch the current status quo.

3. Rule Breaker. Thoughtfully challenges the way things are
“always” done.

4. Producer. Hustles, gets things done, creates rapid learning
cycles for his or her teams, and is responsible for shipping a
“final” product.

5. Storyteller. Captures the hearts and minds of a community to
amplify the good and create authentic community.

These new roles will help school leaders realize both their true
potential and the true potential of their organizations. We are at
the forefront of the design + education movement.

Gallagher, Alyssa, and Kami Thordarson. Design Thinking for School Leaders : Five Roles and Mindsets That Ignite Positive
Change, Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development, 2018. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/amridge/detail.action?docID=5437456.
Created from amridge on 2021-08-30 17:17:58.

C
o
p
yr

ig
h
t
©

2
0
1
8
.
A

ss
o
ci

a
tio

n
f
o
r

S
u
p
e
rv

is
io

n
&

C
u
rr

ic
u
lu

m
D

e
ve

lo
p
m

e
n
t.
A

ll
ri
g
h
ts

r
e
se

rv
e
d
.

Design-Inspired Leadership • 9

Design Thinking

Everything in modern society is the result of a collection of decisions

made by someone. Why shouldn’t that someone be you?

—Tom Kelley, Creative Confidence:
Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All

Before we dive into reimagining the principal role, it will be help-
ful to have a basic understanding of Design Thinking and some
foundational design principles. Design Thinking isn’t unknown in
the educational space. In recent years, interest in Design Think-
ing has grown among educators as it is a natural complement to
inquiry, project-based learning, collaboration, and problem solv-
ing. Increasingly, teachers are being trained in how to use Design
Thinking as a means to promote student creativity and problem
solving. In fact, you can join a community of teachers having
weekly conversations about Design Thinking in the classroom
by using #dtk12chat on Twitter every Wednesday night. There
are three primary ways we see Design Thinking being used in
education today:

1. As a pedagogical tool (essentially teaching students to be
design thinkers)

2. As a tool for teachers to design learning experiences
3. As a tool for school leaders to design school change

While the awareness of Design Thinking is growing among teach-
ers, less attention has been paid to how leading like a designer
can influence both the rate and type of changes being made
in education.

Design Thinking is a process for problem solving and a method
for creative action whose origins date back to the 1960s, when
design methods and practices were being investigated as a way
to solve “wicked problems.” “Wicked problems are those that are
difficult or impossible to solve because of incomplete, contradic-
tory, and changing requirements that are challenging to recognize”

Gallagher, Alyssa, and Kami Thordarson. Design Thinking for School Leaders : Five Roles and Mindsets That Ignite Positive
Change, Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development, 2018. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/amridge/detail.action?docID=5437456.
Created from amridge on 2021-08-30 17:17:58.

C
o
p
yr

ig
h
t
©

2
0
1
8
.
A

ss
o
ci

a
tio

n
f
o
r

S
u
p
e
rv

is
io

n
&

C
u
rr

ic
u
lu

m
D

e
ve

lo
p
m

e
n
t.
A

ll
ri
g
h
ts

r
e
se

rv
e
d
.

10 • Design Thinking for School Leaders

(Wicked problem, n.d., para. 1). Think of global warming or world
hunger. In education, think of personalized learning, closing the
achievement gap, or meeting the needs of second-language learn-
ers. Design Thinking began moving into the business world in two
major areas: companies using the design process to create innova-
tive products, and companies using the design process to rethink
their current methods and models of operation.

We begin with the process, because it is in the process that
the mindsets of designers come to life. Figure 1.4 is an example
based on one of the most well-known design thinking processes
from the Stanford d.school.

Figure 1.4

Design Thinking Process

To help you better understand Design Thinking, Figure 1.5
outlines the purpose of each stage in the design thinking pro-
cess, design thinking mindsets, and helpful tips to keep in mind.
While this overview only touches the surface of Design Thinking,
it will help you understand the foundation from which we are
building. We encourage you to jump in and play. Design Thinking

Wo
nd

er Question Ideate

Reflection

Define

Empathize Test

Prototype

Gallagher, Alyssa, and Kami Thordarson. Design Thinking for School Leaders : Five Roles and Mindsets That Ignite Positive
Change, Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development, 2018. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/amridge/detail.action?docID=5437456.
Created from amridge on 2021-08-30 17:17:58.

C
o
p
yr

ig
h
t
©

2
0
1
8
.
A

ss
o
ci

a
tio

n
f
o
r

S
u
p
e
rv

is
io

n
&

C
u
rr

ic
u
lu

m
D

e
ve

lo
p
m

e
n
t.
A

ll
ri
g
h
ts

r
e
se

rv
e
d
.

Design-Inspired Leadership • 11

Figure 1.5

Design Thinking Process, Mindsets, and Helpful Tips

Wonder
and

Question

Mindfulness is becoming an important component to our
lives. Part of wondering and questioning is to become
aware of your own identity, values, emotions, biases, and
assumptions that you may be carrying into the process.

Ask, “How might my perceptions and assumptions influence
my thinking?”

Helpful tips:
• List everything you think or think you might know about

the person or situation you’re designing for.
• Reflect on where your bias may be showing and ask

where your knowledge or full understanding may be
lacking.

• What new wonders and questions do you have?

Empathize Learn about the audience for which you are designing.

Ask, “Who is my user?” “What is important to this person?”

Helpful tips:
• Three quick ways to develop empathy are observation,

interview, and immersion. The art of empathetic observa-
tion is a means to observe and listen to our users as they
teach and learn. It’s like looking over their shoulders while
trying to imagine what they are thinking and feeling. The
empathy interview is an approach to finding out as much
as possible about a person’s experience as the user of a
space, a process, an objective, or an environment. Immer-
sion is your most powerful tool for achieving empathy, as
it allows you to enter the world of your users. In schools,
this means shadowing a student or teacher for the day.

• When designing for a large group, identify your extreme
users and design to the edges. List a number of facets to
explore within your design space, then think of people
who may be extreme in those facets. This helps you pull
out meaningful needs that may not pop when engaging
with the middle of the bell curve. Pay special attention to
work-arounds (or other extreme behaviors) that can serve
as inspiration and uncover insights.

continued

Gallagher, Alyssa, and Kami Thordarson. Design Thinking for School Leaders : Five Roles and Mindsets That Ignite Positive
Change, Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development, 2018. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/amridge/detail.action?docID=5437456.
Created from amridge on 2021-08-30 17:17:58.

C
o
p
yr

ig
h
t
©

2
0
1
8
.
A

ss
o
ci

a
tio

n
f
o
r

S
u
p
e
rv

is
io

n
&

C
u
rr

ic
u
lu

m
D

e
ve

lo
p
m

e
n
t.
A

ll
ri
g
h
ts

r
e
se

rv
e
d
.

12 • Design Thinking for School Leaders

Figure 1.5 (continued )

Design Thinking Process, Mindsets, and Helpful Tips

Define Create a point of view that is based on user needs and
insights.

Ask, “What are their needs?”

Helpful tips:
• Clarity at this stage can lead to more relevant solutions.

Move beyond what seems to be the apparent need and
dig deep. What are we really solving? If you don’t have as
much clarity as you want at an early stage, remember that
while some problems are defined for us, others may be
discovered in the design process.

Ideate Brainstorm and come up with as many creative solutions as
possible.

Ask crazy questions to prompt thinking. “How would I solve
this problem if I had $1 million?” “How would Walt Disney
solve this problem?”

Helpful tips:
• Good ideating takes a page from improv. Try “yes, and

. . .” not “yes, but . . . ”

• Don’t limit yourself; go for quantity!

Prototype Build a representation of one or more of your ideas to show
others.

Ask, “How can I show my idea?” “What does a rough draft of
this idea look like?”

Helpful tips:
• Don’t fall in love with your idea; our first ideas are usually

our worst! Get feedback quickly to keep your relationship
with your idea healthy.

• You can use anything as prototyping materials—remem-
ber, you are just building to learn.

Gallagher, Alyssa, and Kami Thordarson. Design Thinking for School Leaders : Five Roles and Mindsets That Ignite Positive
Change, Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development, 2018. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/amridge/detail.action?docID=5437456.
Created from amridge on 2021-08-30 17:17:58.

C
o
p
yr

ig
h
t
©

2
0
1
8
.
A

ss
o
ci

a
tio

n
f
o
r

S
u
p
e
rv

is
io

n
&

C
u
rr

ic
u
lu

m
D

e
ve

lo
p
m

e
n
t.
A

ll
ri
g
h
ts

r
e
se

rv
e
d
.

Design-Inspired Leadership • 13

Test Share a prototyped idea with your original use for feedback.

Ask, “What worked?” “What didn’t?” “What can be improved?”

Helpful tips:
• Encourage honest feedback.
• Poor designs are often the result of not spending enough

time in the testing phase. Cycle back and forth between
prototyping and testing as many times as needed.

Reflection Reflection is an ongoing process throughout the design
thinking process.

Ask, “What evidence do we have that we are self-aware and
self-correcting as we move through the process?”

Helpful tips:
• Include time for reflection at various points in your pro-

cess. (Take a selfie!)
• Don’t forget to check in on the emotional state of your

team. Is it impacting the work?
• Build in time to connect and release frustrations.

embraces a bias toward action, and the process can easily be
applied anywhere in your life. Not ready to experiment at work?
Then test out the process with a problem at home. Either way,
the reference tool will be helpful as you learn to navigate the
design process for yourself. And remember, the only way to get
better at Design Thinking is to engage in the messiness of it.

Another version of the design process, which was created by
IDEO, one of the most well-known design firms, is “Inspiration,
Ideation, and Implementation.” As described on IDEO.com, “Inspi-
ration is the problem or opportunity that motivates the search
for solutions. Ideation is the process of generating, developing,
and testing ideas. Implementation is the path that leads from …

Place your order now for a similar assignment and have exceptional work written by one of our experts, guaranteeing you an A result.

Need an Essay Written?

This sample is available to anyone. If you want a unique paper order it from one of our professional writers.

Get help with your academic paper right away

Quality & Timely Delivery

Free Editing & Plagiarism Check

Security, Privacy & Confidentiality